Food production becomes part of urban daily life again.

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CITY AND ECONOMY
The city is compareable to a metabolism, a catalyzing system consuming resources and matter and turning it into pollution and waste.

CITY AND ENERGY
A third of world total primary energy is required to keep our food sector running. This percentage is most likely to increase.

CITY AND LAND
We're expecting the urban population to grow. Each squaremeter a city grows require ten squaremeters of additional agricultural land.

CITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Cities are dependent from global food transportation networks with negative effects on deforestation and transportation.

THE OPPORTUNITY

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SYNERGY POTENTIALS
Redensification of programme and functions enable the actual potential to use energetic synergy potentials.

LOCAL FOOD
Consumers ask for local food. Vertical Farming can provide that. Local politics directly can react on local markets and local needs.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Vertical Farms attract professions and experts all around food production. From research to preparation, from distribution to education.

CIRCULAR ECONOMY
Vertical Farming provides the opportunity to change linear processes to sustainable circular economic practises.

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PROGRAMME MIX
The Vertical Farm is the production entity. Synergy potentials, energetically, can be activated by adding research- and office spaces, living and gastronomy.

CLOSED ENERGY FLOWS
The Vertical Farm's energy concept uses the potential of the spatial unification of the global food supply chain.

URBAN PUBLIC SPACE
The Vertical Farm informs the space around it differently. Food and people are the new design module. Urban activities and public zones are in the centre of the design's interest.

CLOSED MATERIAL FLOWS
Vertical Farm - Market area - urban neighbourhood. Material flows get closed within the urban border. From water and food, from waste to biogas.

REVIEWS, FEEDBACK, TESTIMONIALS

“up!“ by Dr. Daniel Podmirseg compares and contrasts in detail the global input (land use, energy, water, etc.) needed to feed 9.4 billion people using traditional and non-traditional farming technologies. It further examines the impact of these two agricultural approaches from a climate, social, and political perspective.
This exhaustive body of work presents the best view so far published on what the world would be like if alternative agricultural strategies were employed to feed some 9.6 billion people. 
"up" is a blueprint for how to proceed into the next millennium, enabling humans to finally achieve a peaceful co-existence with the rest of nature.
Prof. Dr. Dickson Despommier (Columbia University)

Dr. Podmirseg makes a timely and compelling case for the integration of food within the city limits, with the vertical farm as a means to that end. With his help we are one step closer to understanding how to get it right.
Prof. Dr. Nirmal Kishnani (National University of Sinagapore)

More about "up!" and our other research activities